Has anyone told The Interrupters that the third album should be difficult?

The Interrupters album review

Cover of Fight the Good Fight.

I’ll get back to that train of thought later in the review.  However, here is a little bit of a history lesson.  The Interrupters were formed in 2009, featuring the Bivona brothers (Kevin – guitar & vocals, Justin – bass & vocals and Jesse – drums & vocals) and Aimee Allen (aka Aimee Interrupter) on main vocals.  Fight the Good Fight is their third studio album and it’s been one of those records that people have been raving about for months.  Also, it seems as if you can’t move without The Interrupters appearing on your TV, on your radio or at a show near you.  They’re a band on the rise, there is no doubt about that one.

Since their inception, they have become associated with Rancid.  They’ve toured with Rancid numerous times, they’re involved in the band Tim Timebomb & Friends.  They are signed to Hellcat Record, the home of Rancid.  Finally, Tim Armstrong is also the producer of Fight the Good Fight.  So, even before you’ve heard a note of this album, a lot of people will make assumptions about its sound.  To be fair, you would be spot on in thinking that this is a Ska Punk album.  But it’s not as if The Interrupters have never shied away from that badge.  I think you’ll find they wear it with pride and good on them.

 

Fight the Good Fight find the Interrupters in a positive, take no shit mood.

Every song on this album would make an amazing single and a life anthem for anyone.  This is a record with a social heart, it wants to make people listen and to open their eyes.  On “Rumours & Gossip” they look at the cult of lies which is currently in vogue, on “Outrage” they deal with the current mob mentality which holds sway in mainstream politics and the media.  They also show how they’re going to be moving forward in positive ways such as on “Title Holder” and “Broken World”.

Over the course of twelve songs, The Interrupters try to build a picture that you’re not alone in the world.  They point out that there are others who feel the same and you have brothers/sisters in arms.  There are also songs about relationships (“She’s Kerosene”), admissions of failure (“So Wrong”) and missing those who’ve passed on (“Room with a View”).  Each one of these numbers sounds like sunshine, each one is a memorable gem.  They’ve all brought together to create the strongest Ska Punk albums I’ve heard in years.  To put it mildly, the band have a hit here.

The Interrupters never let the energy or quality drop, not for one iota.

interrupters 2018 review

Fight the Good Fight has such a positive vibe, such a sense of community that it’s so hard to ignore.  It has come out of nowhere for a lot of people, making this one of the surprises of the summer.  It’s a record that you can put on for dancing. It’s equally a political record that can vocalize your feelings.  If you’re not a fan of Ska Punk, I would still advise giving this a shot.  It’s so good that you’ll probably enjoy it.  By definition, the third album should be hard to make.  The third album should be the record where a band loses fans, not gains them.  However, The Interrupters have bucked that trend in style and it’s so refreshing.  For fans of the genre yet to hear this, Fight the Good Fight will be your top album of 2018.  This is my surprise of 2018 and I love it!  Get into this before others tell you they’ve been into them for ages!  The Interrupters will be the name-drop band by everyone by the end of 2018.

 

Eddie Carter

Owner of more Frank Zappa music than one human needs, two cats and looked after by an Angel, Eddie Carter thinks about music more than a Geordie should. Hailing from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK, Eddie spends most of his time surrounded by CD’s and records. He also writes for All The Time I Was Listening to My Own Wall of Sound, his beard is grey and not long enough – also, he wants a pint.